Knock Knock

Knock Knock This fictional memoir establishes Suzanne McNear as a distinctive voice in American literature Written with the same quirky ironic sensibility that brought praise for her story collection Drought i

  • Title: Knock Knock
  • Author: Suzanne McNear
  • ISBN: 9781579622862
  • Page: 238
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This fictional memoir establishes Suzanne McNear as a distinctive voice in American literature Written with the same quirky, ironic sensibility that brought praise for her story collection, Drought, it carries the reader through the upheavals of the sixties and seventies the impact of Betty Friedan, the assassination of President Kennedy, and the Vietnam War in a stylThis fictional memoir establishes Suzanne McNear as a distinctive voice in American literature Written with the same quirky, ironic sensibility that brought praise for her story collection, Drought, it carries the reader through the upheavals of the sixties and seventies the impact of Betty Friedan, the assassination of President Kennedy, and the Vietnam War in a style that is comic and painful and true.It traces March River s journey from before birth, through her early years in a small Midwestern city where she felt always slightly out of step, east to boarding school in Connecticut, and finally to Vassar, where she finally felt at home Unfortunately, on graduation, and unlike most of her classmates, she has no engagement ring, nor promise of one Perhaps you re one of those people who will never marry, her mother , a woman known to rattle her pearls and hit a mean golf ball announces.After various jobs in New York and a love affair that ends abruptly she follows what seems the only practical path pregnancy, marriage, children and life in Chicago Seven years later, after many upheavals, there is a divorce and a terrifying breakdown Her husband s chief occupation was writing mystery novels and opening bottles of Heaven Hill bourbon Life was marked by the birth of three daughters and economic disaster.This is a portrait of a woman who is fragile, uncertain, sometimes overwhelmed by life, but also fiercely committed to the survival of herself and her daughters With courage, black humor, and unusual literary friendships, which included Saul Bellow, she eventually becomes an editor at Playboy and finally finds a sense of peace and accomplishments.

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      238 Suzanne McNear
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      Posted by:Suzanne McNear
      Published :2019-05-24T04:23:42+00:00

    One thought on “Knock Knock”

    1. I read Knock Knock on my Kindle because I couldn't wait for it to ship, and it is one of those books that reads great on a tablet or e-reader. It was my first experience with Suzanne McNear, recommended by a friend who told me, "It's a novel, but it's really a memoir." I had heard about writers producing novels that were actually thinly veiled autobiography; even F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender is the Night is said to be about his relationship with Zelda. But what I got out of McNear's new fictiona [...]

    2. Before she was born, March Rivers listened to the music of promise and dreamed the things she might do with this wonderful life. But her premature arrival as a “four-pound tomato” sets her off on the wrong foot. Failing to fulfill other people's expectations, March finds her own life also failing to live up to her dreams as she grows up.Suzanne McNear’s Knock Knock, a Life brings a world of bright hopes and hard knocks into focus, where the Bishop rushes through confirmation, post-WWII son [...]

    3. Wow, what a surprisingly delightful book! I received a copy from the publisher and, admittedly it did take me a while to really get into the story. The book is described as a "fictional memoir" but it didn't read like a memoir to me. It was actually quite stylized and reminded me of "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man." It sort of meandered from one moment to the next and the lack of quotation marks was at first difficult to adjust to but later helped the narrative to flow unencumbered. Onc [...]

    4. My enjoyment of this book almost snuck up on me. I initially chose it for a glimpse of another time, but around the middle I realized I identify with March Rivers. Even though we hail from different eras and different points in our lives, I empathized with many of her life’s events. I see a lot of uncertainly amongst my peers and feel the same. We all approach the end of our lives as students and dread the unknown of the real world. March showed that same anxiety, but she also showed me mistak [...]

    5. *Knock, Knock* seemed unlike any book I have read before. In this world of by-passed editors and self-publishing, I stopped shortly after beginning to check for a publisher. For, if " close 1st person point of view" is described as the reader seeing the story unfold from the shoulder of the protagonist, then McNear achieves a SUPER-close 1st person point of view--she takes you right behind the eyeballs of March Rivers Wright, to an assault of unprocessed impressions that culminate in shaping wom [...]

    6. Knock, knock.Who's there?March.March who?March Rivers, that's who, and she's no joke, she's the puckish, plucky heroine of this shaggy doggerel story that fairly leaps from Suzanne McNear's vivid, wry memory and imagination. A gimlet-eyed young mid-west gal, March heads east in a quest for self and other answers to questions that nice people didn't ask in those pre-Feminine Mystique days; at least not out loud. If you cherish Franny Glass and Holly Golightly, March Rivers will steal you away, he [...]

    7. I was surprised by how much I actually liked this book. I mean, what's a "fictional memoir"? I was annoyed by the idea, it seemed gimmicky to me. Basically, a memoir, but told like a novel, using third person and a fictional name. I was prepared to hate it. But, Suzanne McNear is an engaging writer with a great story to tell. I just couldn't help but like her (the fictional "her" anyway), and I wanted to know how the story ended! An easy read, you'll especially like it if you like memoirs, stori [...]

    8. I received an Advance Reader's Copy of this book.Described as a "fictional memoir" - which I guess means that it's an account of the author's life, told through the perspective of a fictional character. I was surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did. The story is about March Rivers, who grows up in the Midwest, goes to school in Connecticut and Vassar, marries and has three girls. She eventually gets divorced but then goes through a nervous breakdown. She survives all of this and come [...]

    9. Although this is McNear's first novel, she is no amateur writer, having spent years in magazine publications as an editor and later a freelance journalist. It is not clear if this might be a fictional creation or an actual memoir by the author using a fictional name. Nevertheless, it is a well written book with nice visual images that are presented as run-on phrases at times and yet has structure to take the main character from birth and an early struggle to mature adulthood.This book was receiv [...]

    10. One of those books that no matter how many times I picked it up, I couldn't get into to. I only manged to get about half way before I gave up, for now at least. Not to say that it is a bad story, but something about it just didn't pique my interest. Maybe one of these days I'll be able to pick it up again and get sucked in.

    11. I appreciated the fun aura in this book. I must also add that I greatly enjoy novels and memoirs and Knock Knock quenched my thirst.

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